Virginia Museum of Fine Arts – Pablo Picasso!

Picasso’s paintings exude loneliness, sadness, a dark side, an obsessiveness and complexity towards the relationships in his life. He was a man of numerous indiscretions; he seems as if he had this complex about female obsessiveness.

A selection of Picasso’s famous artwork is on exhibit at the Virginia Museum of Fine Arts in Richmond, VA, in conjunction with the Musee National Picasso, Paris.  As you enter the museum you can see the crowded line of people awaiting a view of the exhibit of this famous artist who was barely recognized for his work when he was alive.

One of our Team members thought it would be a great experience for all of us to make the Exhibit a Team Fun Activity.  It did not sound so fun when I first glanced at my email to read the details of our “fun day event,” until we got to the museum and I laid my eyes on the very first painting of “Celestina” (La Celestine), painted oil on canvas by Picasso in 1904.  I had the audio glued to my ears so I did not miss any detail of the critique of this painting. This was a painting of a creepy old woman with dark cloak and hood set upon a blue background.  As I looked at this painting, I saw a sick woman; he painted this woman so distorted, but I am sure she did not look as he portrayed her in this painting.  So, I noted to myself – Picasso paints how he see his subject, viewed through his own lens.  In other words, not a reality painter.

As I slowly walked through with my Team, viewing the different periods of Picasso’s work, I began to believe he was a painter who did not clearly know what he wanted to paint or do with his creative talents, throughout his “Blue Period,” the “Rose Period,” “Cubism,” “Classicism,” “Photographs”, “Muse and Metamorphosis,” “Political,” and “Picasso and War Period”. One begins to think he was all over the board with his work. He was no Rembrandt for sure.

His paintings exude loneliness, sadness, a dark side, an obsessiveness and complexity towards the relationships in his life. He was a man of numerous indiscretions; he seems as if he had this complex about female obsessiveness.  All the paintings of women are in bad taste, with the exception of his love for Olga the Ballerina, who he married in 1918. His drawings of the female body were of bits and pieces randomly put together. There is a lot of ambiguity in his work, as one can tell from looking at the exhibit.

Overall, I left the VMFA knowledgeable of Picasso’s life and history, of what he left behind, and the value he brought to the art world.  The Museum is not as big as the MOMA NY but for a small-city museum, it is worth an afternoon’s stroll, especially for a Picasso exhibit. I am glad I did not miss this experience, as I do not know when again I would have the opportunity to come so close to Picasso’s work.

Our 9-year-old son won an award for art the same day we saw Picasso – perhaps the next great artist in the making 🙂

1 Comment

  1. Casey

    Yeah!!! My little Picasso or Michelangelo.

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